Innovate Indiana Blog to get a makeover and a new name. Stay tuned for the August 1 debut!

Posted on July 22nd, 2016 | By Bill W. Hornaday

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Exclamation points are generally a no-no when writing headlines. But here at the Innovate Indiana Blog, we’re going to make an exception — just this once — to make an important and exciting announcement.

Effective Aug. 1, the Innovate Indiana Blog will have a newer, cleaner appearance and a different name to be revealed that same day. As our web development team makes the transition from the old format to the new, the Innovate Indiana Blog will “go dark” for one week starting July 25.

Upon its return, our renovated blog will continue to bring readers news of innovation, technology transfer and commercialization and economic enhancement within the Innovate Indiana universe as we strive to help the Hoosier State generate long-term prosperity through developing a culture of building and making.

Along with regular posts from myself and Steve Martin, the blog will continue to feature guest posts and articles from Innovate Indiana’s executive team, as well as key figures in ingenuity, entrepreneurship and economic development at IU campuses throughout the state.

We hope you enjoy our new format as the Innovate Indiana Blog begins a new chapter in its six-year history.

Arrhythmotech receives $1.47 million grant

Posted on July 21st, 2016 | By Steve Martin

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Arrhythmotech LLC, which was launched through the Spin Up program at Indiana University Research and Technology Corp., has received  a two-year STTR Phase II grant worth $1,472,476 from the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Peng-Sheng Chen, company co-founder, said the grant will be used on new methods to study patients who are affected by atrial fibrillation.

Peng-Sheng Chen

Peng-Sheng Chen

“The grant will allow us to collaborate with investigators at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles,” he said.

More information about the NIH grant and how Arrhythmotech will benefit is here.

U.S. FDA accepts ApeX Therapeutics application to test lead drug candidate

Posted on July 20th, 2016 | By Steve Martin

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ApeX Therapeutics, which has received an investment from the Innovate Indiana Fund and licenses technology through Indiana University Research and Technology Corp., has had its Investigational New Drug (IND) application accepted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The company will conduct clinical testing of its lead drug candidate, APX3330, in pancreatic cancer.

Mark R. Kelley, Ph.D., is Scientific Founder of ApeX Therapeutics. He also is the Betty and Earl Herr Chair in Pediatric Oncology Research and Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Pharmacology and Toxicology at Indiana University School of Medicine.

Mark R. Kelley

Mark R. Kelley

“We are very excited to have reached this very important milestone to evaluate APX3330 in patients with pancreatic cancer,” he said. “We are now poised to initiate the study in the coming months.”

More information about the U.S. FDA acceptance of the IND application is here.

IURTC licenses School of Medicine cell technology to U.K. company

Posted on July 19th, 2016 | By Steve Martin

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Axol Bioscience Ltd., based in Cambridgeshire, U.K., has licensed technology developed at the Indiana University School of Medicine.

The license agreement with Indiana University Research and Technology Corp. is for technology that creates cells found on the interior of blood vessels. It was developed by Dr. Mervin C. Yoder and Nutan Prasain, Ph.D.

Mervin C. Yoder

Mervin C. Yoder

“We developed the methods that were required to direct the differentiation of the stem cells into endothelial colony forming cells, or ECFC, the progenitor cells that give rise to endothelial cells,” Yoder said. “The ECFC-derived endothelial cells display potent proliferative potential and in vivo vessel formation.”

Axol Bioscience will produce the cells and sell them to industrial and academic researchers.

More information about the licensing agreement and the technology are available here.